Crepitus Itself is no Cause for Concern, but May Signal Onset Osteoarthritis

Elderly person grabbing their knee in pain

Crepitus is just a fancy word for the grinding, popping, or cracking sound your joints make when you move. Think about the fun noises you make when you stand and stretch after sitting for a while. It’s something that becomes more common with age. And while it’s a frequent diagnosis, sometimes chiropractors don’t explain it fully. It’s important to understand whether this condition is a sign of a larger problem or not.

There are some times when it’s important to address crepitus as a condition and other times when it’s just noise, so to speak. For example, if your cracking and popping is accompanied by discomfort or soreness, it may be a sign of developing osteoarthritis. Suddenly, crepitus becomes a big cause for concern, because it’s a signal for something bigger.

The fact is, a majority of older adults have arthritis that linked to their various crepitus-inspired noises. Chiropractic may effectively ease symptoms linked to this condition, letting you stretch and make noise without the fear that’s accompanied by an underlying diagnosis. All it takes is some confirmation from the chiropractic professionals at Advanced Spine & Posture in Las Vegas, NV.

The different forms of crepitus

Not all joint noises are indicative of arthritis. For example, when a chiropractor adjusts you it’s often followed by a pop or crack. This isn’t arthritis – it’s just synovial fluid being affected by pressure. Crepitus is something different and can take different forms. In most cases, it’s noise produced by air bubbles moving through joints, unaccompanied by pain. This is not a cause for concern.

Cartilage degeneration surrounding the joint is more likely to cause pain. This is a problem and is often a sign of osteoarthritis. The noise produced here is more of a grinding one, signaling friction in the joint. Tendons and ligaments snapping around the joint’s bone structure may also cause sounds and be painful.

Qualifying crepitus noises

In cases where cartilage degeneration has set in, bones grind against one another during movement. Not only is this painful, it also means that the bone is gradually being worn down. This is a major problem that can lead to long-term health complications. Osteoarthritis is at the top of the list.

The development of osteoarthritis is common in the knees, hips, shoulders, spine, and neck. Not coincidentally, these are also prime areas for cracking, snapping, and popping noises to occur. This is why it’s so important to seek chiropractic evaluation if these noises are followed by discomfort.

Chiropractic management of osteoarthritis

A chiropractor can be your partner in qualifying crepitus and, if needed, combating the effects of osteoarthritis. For example, they can coordinate a low-impact exercise regimen. This is important for restoring soft tissue, ligaments, and tendons, to provide more support for joint structures. Everything from cycling, to walking, to swimming can be effective at reducing symptoms.

Chiropractic treatment can also reduce your dependence on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which only temporarily limit pain, but come with a host of harmful side effects. Most importantly, chiropractic may help alleviate excessive strain on the body by restoring ideal posture and support.

If your joints are making sounds and you’re experiencing pain, it’s time to see a chiropractor. The expert team at Advanced Spine & Posture can help qualify crepitus concerns in Las Vegas, NV patients. And, if osteoarthritis is a concern, we can put Chiropractic BioPhysics (CBP) data to work helping you get a jump on managing it. Schedule a free consultation with us today.

Chiropractic BioPhysics, or CBP, is one of the most scientific, researched, and results-oriented corrective care techniques. CBP-trained chiropractors aim to realign the spine back to health, eliminating nerve interference and addressing the source of pain, fatigue, and disease. As with all chiropractic care, CBP is gentle, painless, and non-invasive.